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Putin: Libel Law Unlikely to Be Used in Politics Very Much
Interfax - 7.31.12 - JRL 2012-139

SELIGER, Russia. July 31 (Interfax) - President Vladimir Putin argued on Tuesday that the new law laying down tougher penalties for slander and libel is likely to be used by business people and members of artistic and scholarly professions a lot more often than by politicians. File Photo of Vladimir Putin at Desk
file photo

"Obviously, people must be able to protect their honor and dignity against slander and libel in court," Putin said in answering questions from members of the Seliger 2012 youth discussion club.

He claimed that the new law entails no radical change because the penalties it mandates do not include detention.

"So it's just about a pretty impressive fine. And there is something I want to draw your attention to - it's very important; I think that the opportunities that this law offers may and will least of all be used by people who engage in political activities," Putin said. "By definition, one who engages in politics will hardly go to court to accuse anyone, least of all journalists, of libel."

"But this (law) is likely to be used, I think, by members of all kinds of professions, primarily cultural professions, the show business, art in the broad sense of the word, scholars and members of the entrepreneurial class," Putin said.

"Libel against business figures may lead to serious losses in their business, loss of confidence and the like. So the possibility of going to court to seek the defense of one's honor and dignity, the recovery of one's good name, may even have a material dimension," he said.

Keywords: Russia, Government, Politics - Russian News - Russia - Johnson's Russia List

 

SELIGER, Russia. July 31 (Interfax) - President Vladimir Putin argued on Tuesday that the new law laying down tougher penalties for slander and libel is likely to be used by business people and members of artistic and scholarly professions a lot more often than by politicians.

File Photo of Vladimir Putin at Desk
file photo

"Obviously, people must be able to protect their honor and dignity against slander and libel in court," Putin said in answering questions from members of the Seliger 2012 youth discussion club.

He claimed that the new law entails no radical change because the penalties it mandates do not include detention.

"So it's just about a pretty impressive fine. And there is something I want to draw your attention to - it's very important; I think that the opportunities that this law offers may and will least of all be used by people who engage in political activities," Putin said. "By definition, one who engages in politics will hardly go to court to accuse anyone, least of all journalists, of libel."

"But this (law) is likely to be used, I think, by members of all kinds of professions, primarily cultural professions, the show business, art in the broad sense of the word, scholars and members of the entrepreneurial class," Putin said.

"Libel against business figures may lead to serious losses in their business, loss of confidence and the like. So the possibility of going to court to seek the defense of one's honor and dignity, the recovery of one's good name, may even have a material dimension," he said.


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