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Russians Not Afraid Of 'Orange Menace', Pollster Says
RIA-Novosti - 2.28.12 - JRL 2012-36

Russians do not believe in the "Orange menace" despite warnings by political analyst Sergey Kurginyan and the anti-Orange committee, RIA Novosti news agency reported on 28 February quoting the head of VTsIOM (All-Russia Centre for the Study of Public Opinion) polling agency, Valeriy Fedorov.

Map of CIS European States"Attempts to speak of the Orange menace made by Kurginyan and some other colleagues fall short of reaching the hearts and minds. Of course, they have their audience (their supporters), it is still there, but it has shrunk considerably compared to what it was several years ago," Fedorov said at a meeting of the People's Club, part of the All-Russia People's Front.

One of the latest polls conducted by VTsIOM asked those polled to name threats they consider most credible. Only 10 per cent have subscribed to the opinion that "there is a real threat that an Orange revolution similar to those, which happened in Ukraine, Georgia or Kyrgyzstan, will happen in Russia", Fedorov said. At the same time, he praised the public resonance generated by Vladimir Putin's latest article on foreign policy, which he considers Putin's strong point. That inconsistency has given rise to a paradox of sorts, Fedorov said.

"Putin has been active and successful in foreign policy, but things have reached a point, when most Russians are no longer particularly interested in foreign policy. Today, foreign policy issues belong mainly to the mass media. External threats may be rising from the pundits' and politicians' points of view, but in the eyes of the people they are decreasing today," Fedorov added.

Keywords: Russia, Government, Politics - Russia News - Russia

 

Russians do not believe in the "Orange menace" despite warnings by political analyst Sergey Kurginyan and the anti-Orange committee, RIA Novosti news agency reported on 28 February quoting the head of VTsIOM (All-Russia Centre for the Study of Public Opinion) polling agency, Valeriy Fedorov.

Map of CIS European States"Attempts to speak of the Orange menace made by Kurginyan and some other colleagues fall short of reaching the hearts and minds. Of course, they have their audience (their supporters), it is still there, but it has shrunk considerably compared to what it was several years ago," Fedorov said at a meeting of the People's Club, part of the All-Russia People's Front.

One of the latest polls conducted by VTsIOM asked those polled to name threats they consider most credible. Only 10 per cent have subscribed to the opinion that "there is a real threat that an Orange revolution similar to those, which happened in Ukraine, Georgia or Kyrgyzstan, will happen in Russia", Fedorov said. At the same time, he praised the public resonance generated by Vladimir Putin's latest article on foreign policy, which he considers Putin's strong point. That inconsistency has given rise to a paradox of sorts, Fedorov said.

"Putin has been active and successful in foreign policy, but things have reached a point, when most Russians are no longer particularly interested in foreign policy. Today, foreign policy issues belong mainly to the mass media. External threats may be rising from the pundits' and politicians' points of view, but in the eyes of the people they are decreasing today," Fedorov added.