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Russian presidential elections, 4 March 2012 - 5 main scenarios of vote casting: results of an independent survey
Elena Avetova - R-Research Ltd. - 2.24.12 - JRL 2012-34

From: "Elena Avetova \(RR\)" <ea@r-research.net>
Subject: Press release: Russian presidential elections, 4 March 2012 - 5 main scenarios of vote casting: results of an independent survey
Date: Tue, 21 Feb 2012
Kremlin and St. Basil's

I'd like to submit our press-release which describes five main scenarios of voting at the Russian presidential elections on 4 March 2012.

We have just completed another survey (1800 interviews face-to-face at respondents' homes) in Russia, and the data from two surveys supports each other well.

PRESS RELEASE

[introduction]

Russian presidential elections, 4 March 2012 - 5 main scenarios of vote casting: results of an independent survey

"In January 2012, there was much press speculation in the Russian media about whether there would be a second round in the upcoming Russian presidential election. Since then VCIOM, a Russian official polling agency, has reported a rapid rise in the ratings of Vladimir Putin, approaching 55% in a recent February poll. On 20th February, at the INTERFAX press-conference VCIOM announced that the prediction of vote casting for Putin is 59%. However, we have conducted an independent survey which identifies 5 main scenarios of vote casting in the upcoming Russian presidential elections in which Putin could receive between 42% and 58% of the votes. Gaining 58% of the votes is the most optimistic scenario, but this is the only one presented by VCIOM. Should the Russian voters and the general public be made aware of other scenarios?

"In our survey, which was conducted in late January 2012, we asked the following question: "Which candidate will you vote for in the 2012 presidential election?", 34% of the respondents replied that they would cast their vote for Vladimir Putin, 11% for Gennady Zyuganov, 6% for Vladimir Zhirinovsky, 5% for Mikhail Prokhorov, 4% for Sergei Mironov and 12% replied that they would not vote. Therefore, out of all respondents, 72% had already made up their mind about how they would vote in the election, whereas 28%, nearly every third respondent, remained undecided...."

Go to http://r-research.net/tmp/RRpressreleaseen190212.pdf for the complete text with charts.

Elena Avetova
Research Director
Address for correspondence:
R-Research Ltd, Office 203, 266 Banbury Road, Oxford, OX2 7DL
+44 7947 350579, ig@r-research.net; www.r-research.net

Keywords: Russia, Election, Politics - Russia News - Russia

 

From: "Elena Avetova \(RR\)" <ea@r-research.net>
Subject: Press release: Russian presidential elections, 4 March 2012 - 5 main scenarios of vote casting: results of an independent survey
Date: Tue, 21 Feb 2012

Kremlin and St. Basil's

I'd like to submit our press-release which describes five main scenarios of voting at the Russian presidential elections on 4 March 2012.

We have just completed another survey (1800 interviews face-to-face at respondents' homes) in Russia, and the data from two surveys supports each other well.

PRESS RELEASE

[introduction]

Russian presidential elections, 4 March 2012 - 5 main scenarios of vote casting: results of an independent survey

"In January 2012, there was much press speculation in the Russian media about whether there would be a second round in the upcoming Russian presidential election. Since then VCIOM, a Russian official polling agency, has reported a rapid rise in the ratings of Vladimir Putin, approaching 55% in a recent February poll. On 20th February, at the INTERFAX press-conference VCIOM announced that the prediction of vote casting for Putin is 59%. However, we have conducted an independent survey which identifies 5 main scenarios of vote casting in the upcoming Russian presidential elections in which Putin could receive between 42% and 58% of the votes. Gaining 58% of the votes is the most optimistic scenario, but this is the only one presented by VCIOM. Should the Russian voters and the general public be made aware of other scenarios?

"In our survey, which was conducted in late January 2012, we asked the following question: "Which candidate will you vote for in the 2012 presidential election?", 34% of the respondents replied that they would cast their vote for Vladimir Putin, 11% for Gennady Zyuganov, 6% for Vladimir Zhirinovsky, 5% for Mikhail Prokhorov, 4% for Sergei Mironov and 12% replied that they would not vote. Therefore, out of all respondents, 72% had already made up their mind about how they would vote in the election, whereas 28%, nearly every third respondent, remained undecided...."

Go to http://r-research.net/tmp/RRpressreleaseen190212.pdf for the complete text with charts.

Elena Avetova
Research Director
Address for correspondence: R-Research Ltd, Office 203, 266 Banbury Road, Oxford, OX2 7DL
+44 7947 350579, ig@r-research.net; www.r-research.net